Your child’s immune system

Abstract:
Your child’s immune system works around the clock to keep them healthy in a world full of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other micro-organisms that can potentially cause serious illness. We discuss innate and adaptive immune systems, their importance, and how they work together in keeping you and your children healthy.

Key words: Kids Intelligent, IQShield, brain development, nerve development, child development, nutrition for children, child health


Your child’s immune system works around the clock to keep them healthy in a world full of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other micro-organisms that can potentially cause serious illness. Every day, our immune system fights off these invaders, through the interaction of many cells guided by many chemical messengers.

The immune system is divided into two parts - the innate and the adaptive immune systems. The innate (sometimes called natural) immunity is what we are born with, including our skin which prevents a large majority of germs from entering out body, and makes up the environment in and around the various openings in and around our bodies, such as our mouths and noses, which are protected by secretions containing antibodies, anti-microbial agents, and other important cells (phagocytes, natural killer cells) that are capable of killing microbes. The innate immune system is always at work and constantly protecting us. 

The adaptive immune system, consists of the spleen, thymus gland, bone marrow, and various lymph nodes around our body. These structures produce important T and B cells (lymphocytes). T and B cells both circulate in the blood and lymph and act as foreign invader surveillance and “ramp up” in number when an infection occurs. B cells respond to infection by producing antibodies that prevent unwanted invaders from spreading to other parts of our body, neutralising toxins released by bacteria. There are many types of T cells, and depending on cell type, T cells may directly destroy pathogens, or assist B cells, with the ability destroy any virus-infected cells and attracting other components of the immune system to help where required.

These actions are controlled by chemical messengers known as eicosanoids and cytokines.  Eicosanoids are a group of polyunsaturated fats made from the cell membrane fats as needed, while cytokines consist of small proteins. Together the eicosanoids and cytokines control a myriad of immune functions such as:

•    Immune cell development and maturation
•    Immune cell activation
•    Guiding immune cells to travel to the site of infection
•    Detecting and killing invading microbes
•    Blood clotting
•    Blood flow
•    Pain
References

•    Wikipedia, Immune system.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immune_system
•    Wikipedia. Eicosanoid.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eicosanoid
•    Wikipedia. Cytokine.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytokine
•    Wikipedia, Eye.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eye

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